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April 12, 2008 

Mass grave unearthed in northern Afghanistan
Sat Apr 12, 5:45 AM ET
MAZAR-I-SHARIF, Afghanistan (Reuters) - Afghan authorities have discovered a mass grave containing at least 100 bodies believed to be victims of a Taliban massacre in the 1990s, security officials said on Saturday.

Afghan clashes claim 24 Taliban, two Indians: officials
Sat Apr 12, 7:19 AM ET
KABUL (AFP) - Afghan security forces supported by foreign military aircraft killed 24 Taliban rebels in clashes in the southern province of Zabul, authorities said Saturday.

Afghan suicide blast kills 3 Indians, 1 Afghan
Sat Apr 12, 6:36 AM ET
KABUL (Reuters) - A suicide bomber killed three Indian road engineers and an Afghan in southwestern Afghanistan on Saturday in the second deadly attack on road builders in a week.

France's Kouchner says can't stay in Afghanistan for ever
Sat Apr 12, 5:47 AM ET
KABUL (AFP) - French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said Saturday that international forces would not stay in Afghanistan for ever and Afghans had to take over more responsibilities.

Canadian, French foreign ministers meeting with Afghan leader in Kabul
By THE CANADIAN PRESS
KABUL - Foreign Affairs Minister Maxime Bernier and his French counterpart are in Kabul today for a round of meetings with Afghan officials.

US asks SKorea to send personnel to Afghanistan
SEOUL (AFP) - The United States has asked South Korea to send civilian and police personnel to Afghanistan, less than four months after Seoul withdrew its military forces, officials said Saturday.

Para runs marathon in Afghanistan
Saturday, 12 April 2008 13:06 UK BBC News
A British para and commando-trained soldier is planning to take part in Sunday's London Marathon - but at his military base in Afghanistan.

Afghan refugee turns rug exporter in Pakistan
By Rabia Ali
LAHORE, Pakistan, April 11 (UNHCR) Haji Nasim's life is like an intricately woven carpet, one that weaves through the rugged region from one end of Afghanistan to the opposite end of Pakistan.

Whose side are the Afghans on?
Telegraph.co.uk By Con Coughlin  12/04/2008
It took two years of fighting the Taliban to reclaim control of Musa Qala, but British troops in Afghanistan still face the daily prospect of betrayal by locals, reports Con Coughlin
It was meant to be a goodwill gesture

Rudd Says Musharraf Agreed to More `Dialogue' on Afghanistan
By Gemma Daley
April 11 (Bloomberg) -- Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf agreed to continued ``dialogue'' on the fight against the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan.

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Mass grave unearthed in northern Afghanistan
Sat Apr 12, 5:45 AM ET
MAZAR-I-SHARIF, Afghanistan (Reuters) - Afghan authorities have discovered a mass grave containing at least 100 bodies believed to be victims of a Taliban massacre in the 1990s, security officials said on Saturday.

The grave was discovered in the northern province of Balkh, about 15 km (10 miles) from the city of Mazar-i-Sharif.

Provincial security official Abdurrauf Taj said about 100 bodies had been found in the grave, which is about 100 meters (yards) from a residential area.

"We expect the number may rise," Taj told Reuters.

Residents of the area said they suspected the dead were members of the Hazara ethnic minority, massacred after the Taliban captured the area in the late 1990s.

"These were all innocent people killed by the Taliban," said shopkeeper Mohammad Sami.

Provincial security commander Sardar Mohammad Sultani said the dead may have been massacred by the Taliban and investigators hoped to determine the truth.

None of the bodies were being moved until a team from Kabul inspected the site, Sultani said.

Mass graves from Afghanistan's three decades of war are occasionally unearthed in different parts of the country.

Last year, a grave containing several hundred bodies was found in the northeastern province of Badakhshan.
(Reporting by Thair Qadiry; Writing by Jonathon Burch; Editing by Robert Birsel)
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Afghan clashes claim 24 Taliban, two Indians: officials
Sat Apr 12, 7:19 AM ET
KABUL (AFP) - Afghan security forces supported by foreign military aircraft killed 24 Taliban rebels in clashes in the southern province of Zabul, authorities said Saturday.

The operation in Zabul -- one of the most Taliban-troubled regions -- was designed to secure a key highway to the capital Kabul, Zabul deputy governor Gulab Shah Alikhail told AFP.

"We had an operation against Taliban last night. During the operation, in which foreign military's air force was used, 24 Taliban were killed and eight others were injured," he added.

He said the clashes began late Friday and continued into Saturday.

Zabul, which borders Pakistan, sees regular Taliban attacks. On Tuesday, 17 civilian roadworkers were killed in an attack on their convoy near the main town of Qalat.

Three Taliban militants were killed in a subsequent operation against the attackers by Afghan and foreign security forces.

Meanwhile, two Indian engineers and an Afghan policeman died in a Taliban suicide attack in the southwestern province of Nimroz, authorities said.

Two bombers simultaneously struck a convoy carrying Indian and Afghan road construction workers. Officials said a third suspected attacker was captured with an explosive-filled jacket after the blasts, in which he was injured.

"There was a suicide attack carried out by two suicide bombers against Indian roadworkers who were working on a bridge" in the province's Khash Rod district, provincial governor Ghulam Dastgir Azad told AFP.

"Two Indian engineers and an (Afghan) driver were killed. Three Indians and an Afghan policeman were injured," he said.

A Taliban purported spokesman, Yousuf Ahmadi, claimed responsibility but gave a different version of the attack.

He said two mines planted by the insurgents were detonated, after which a bomber blew himself up. "It was carried out by our mujahdeen (holy warriors)," he told AFP by phone.

"First they detonated two mines that we had buried in the area.

"After police and the Indians gathered there, one of our devoted members carried out a suicide bombing."

Saturday's bombing was the second targetting Indian roadworkers this year. An Indian engineer was killed in a similar attack in the same area in January, in which six Afghan policemen also died.

The latest attack follows a suicide car bombing in the southern province of Kandahar which killed eight civilians Thursday.

Including the latest casualties, more than 60 people -- including a Polish soldier serving with the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force -- have been killed in violence in less than two weeks.

The Taliban were ousted from power in a US-led invasion after they refused to hand over Al-Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden, wanted by the United States for the September 11, 2001 attacks in Washington and New York.

Since then, the remnants of the hardline Islamic militia have been waging a guerrilla insurgency aimed at toppling the US-backed government in Kabul and driving out the tens of thousands of foreign troops based here.
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Afghan suicide blast kills 3 Indians, 1 Afghan
Sat Apr 12, 6:36 AM ET
KABUL (Reuters) - A suicide bomber killed three Indian road engineers and an Afghan in southwestern Afghanistan on Saturday in the second deadly attack on road builders in a week.

In a separate incident, 24 Taliban were killed in a joint operation by Afghan and foreign troops in Zabul province on Friday night, deputy provincial governor Gulab Shah Alikheil told reporters.

Intermittent violence has broken out in different parts of Afghanistan in recent weeks following a traditional winter lull.

The suicide attack on the road crew was in the remote southwestern province of Nimroz, said provincial governor Ghulam Dastagir Azad.

"The bomber got out of a car and then blew himself up," Azad told Reuters. Three Indians and an Afghan were killed and three people wounded, the Interior Ministry said.

A Taliban spokesman claimed responsibility, the Pakistan-based Afghan Islamic Press news agency reported.

Ousted in 2001, the Taliban are fighting to expel foreign forces and bring down Afghanistan's Western-backed government.

Their insurgency, which has intensified over the past two years, includes attacks on reconstruction and aid work that the government and its allies hope will win over the people and isolate the insurgent leadership.

Most of the violence is in the south and east, near the border with Pakistan where the Taliban have sanctuaries in remote tribal areas.

Seventeen Afghan road workers were killed in a Taliban attack in the southern province of Zabul on Tuesday.

Zabul deputy governor Gulab Shah Alikheil told reporters 24 Taliban were killed in a ground and air attack by Afghan and foreign troops on Friday night.

There were no casualties among the Afghan and foreign forces, he said.

(Additional reporting by Ismail Sameem; Writing by Sayed Salahuddin; Editing by Robert Birsel and Bill Tarrant)
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France's Kouchner says can't stay in Afghanistan for ever
Sat Apr 12, 5:47 AM ET
KABUL (AFP) - French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said Saturday that international forces would not stay in Afghanistan for ever and Afghans had to take over more responsibilities.

Arriving in Kabul a week after France vowed to nearly double the number of its forces in Afghanistan to 3,000, Kouchner said the foreign military muscle and financial aid ploughed into Afghanistan needed an end product.

"We're not going to leave tomorrow, and we're not going to stay for ever," he told French and other international troops at Camp Warehouse, a major base for NATO-led forces outside Kabul.

"Between the two, we for our part will take account of the responsibilities of the Afghans while they, on their side, assume their responsibilities.

"As soon as that is possible, we will withdraw and hand over to them."

Kouchner was to hold talks with President Hamid Karzai on preparations for an international aid conference which Paris is hosting on June 12.

He will also visit the southern city of Kandahar, former stronghold of the hardline Taliban militia, along with his Canadian counterpart Maxime Bernier, who was due to land later in the weekend.

International-backed forces ousted the Taliban militia from power more than six years ago, but the hardline Islamic militia has stepped up its insurgency over the past year.

A total of about 70,000 foreign soldiers, most of them under NATO command, are still locked down in Afghanistan battling the insurgency.

Kouchner said the French deployments were partly designed to help train the Afghan army, and a battalion of 700 would be sent to the troubled east.

"We will not win this war, we won't lose it either, but we have to win the hearts of the Afghans," he said.

"Our goal is to get closer to the Afghans. We are not waging war against Afghans, but with the Afghans against terrorism."

Kouchner, who flew in from neighbouring Tajikistan, from where some French troops carry out operations in Afghanistan, said military might alone was not enough, pointing to agriculture as another area to help with.

France has six warplanes based at Kandahar, with around 160 troops at Kandahar air base. The south has seen some of the fiercest fighting.

About 1,600 French soldiers are based in the Kabul region.

Canada, for its part, has around 2,500 troops in southern Afghanistan, and has seen 82 of them killed since 2002.
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Canadian, French foreign ministers meeting with Afghan leader in Kabul
By THE CANADIAN PRESS
KABUL - Foreign Affairs Minister Maxime Bernier and his French counterpart are in Kabul today for a round of meetings with Afghan officials.

Spokesmen say Bernier and French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner are having sit-down talks in the Afghan capital with President Hamid Karazi.

Topics up for discussion have not been disclosed.

However, officials say Bernier and Kouchner plan a joint news conference to discuss their meetings. French diplomats said Friday the two men were later heading to Kandahar in southern Afghanistan.

Earlier, Bernier toured the Centre for Tradition Arts in Kabul where he watched craftsmen making chessboards and pottery.

The centre, established by Afghanistan's Turquoise Mountain foundation, is the first aimed at preserving and developing traditional Afghan crafts in wood, calligraphy and ceramics. 
  
The weekend visit by Bernier and Kouchner is meant as a follow-up to the French announcement last week that it is sending 700 more troops to Afghanistan.

France's offer of more troops at a NATO summit in Bucharest averted a looming crisis in the alliance over Afghanistan.

Canada had threatened to pull out its 2,500 beleaguered soldiers in southern Kandahar province unless they got reinforcements from another ally.

France's combat troops are expected to move into eastern Afghanistan, freeing up U.S. forces to help the Canadians in the south.

France currently has 1,430 troops serving as part of the 47,000-strong NATO force in Afghanistan. The U.S. plans to send 3,200 extra marines to Afghanistan.

The trip is also expected to help with France's preparations for an international donors conference for Afghanistan in June.

The conference is aiming at not just raising money but also reaching a broad new international strategy for Afghanistan, a French diplomat said.
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US asks SKorea to send personnel to Afghanistan
SEOUL (AFP) - The United States has asked South Korea to send civilian and police personnel to Afghanistan, less than four months after Seoul withdrew its military forces, officials said Saturday.

Yonhap news agency quoted officials as saying Washington had asked Seoul to send a provincial reconstruction team (PRT) and also a small police force to train local police.

Newspapers carried similar reports.

South Korea sent 210 engineering and medical troops to Afghanistan in February 2002 and withdrew them last December.

Insurgents who took 23 South Korean church volunteers hostage last summer and murdered two of them had demanded the forces be pulled out, which Seoul said was already scheduled.

Yonhap said the issue is likely to be raised when President Lee Myung-Bak meets US President George W. Bush next week. In an earlier report, it said the United States was asking for a team of between 200 to 300 people, with South Korea paying the full cost.

It said South Korea could either send its own troops to guard the civilian team or use US forces. Any military deployment would need approval from the Seoul parliament.

"The government has no official position on the matter yet," an unidentified official was quoted as saying.

"But we will have to start reviewing the case soon, as a request like this -- asking for us to take charge of the training of local forces -- is far beyond a request of just a couple of police officers."

The conservative new legislature elected last Wednesday is expected to back a new deployment of personnel, and Lee has made the strengthening of the US alliance a top priority.

But the official said the government believes it might be accused of inconsistency if it supports a new personnel deployment so soon after withdrawing.

"Thus, the decision will be made after an overall consideration of the effect it will have on Korea-US ties and the extent of local and international criticism," he added. "The decision will take time."
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Para runs marathon in Afghanistan
Saturday, 12 April 2008 13:06 UK BBC News
A British para and commando-trained soldier is planning to take part in Sunday's London Marathon - but at his military base in Afghanistan.

Maj Al Jarvis, 33, of the Royal Engineers, arrived in Helmand last month for a six-month tour with 23 Engineer Regiment.

Maj Jarvis, of Farnborough, Hampshire, will run circuits around the tiny base in Lashkar Gah in 30C heat.

He is raising money for the Army Benevolent Fund.

It is expected to take him five to six hours to complete 38 laps of the base wearing his Osprey body armour, weighing about 12kg.

Troops will be on hand with collecting tins and to keep up Maj Jarvis's morale.

"The London marathon is a feature in the calendar and just because I'm deployed in Afghanistan I don't believe that should stop me taking part - in my own way," said Maj Jarvis, who is part of the UK's 16 Air Assault Brigade, which took command of the British Task Force in Helmand this week.

"It will be tough keeping motivated and focussed doing so many laps of the same circuit, but I'm up for the challenge.

"All of us out here are doing a job we have chosen to do and we accept the consequences. We have trained hard and are prepared for the worst as were others in past conflicts.

"No amount of money can bring back a daddy, husband, daughter or a limb, but the Army Benevolent Fund helps to give some financial stability to families in times of distress.

"I just hope I will be able to finish, as the most laps I have done so far - in my sports kit - is five... only one way to find out," he added.
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Afghan refugee turns rug exporter in Pakistan
By Rabia Ali
LAHORE, Pakistan, April 11 (UNHCR) Haji Nasim's life is like an intricately woven carpet, one that weaves through the rugged region from one end of Afghanistan to the opposite end of Pakistan.

Born in Pashtun Kot in north-western Afghanistan's Faryab province, the ethnic Uzbek grew up in a family that made and traded in carpets. The family moved to the Afghan capital, Kabul, soon after the Soviet invasion in late 1979. Haji Nasim and his brother ventured further and in the mid -1980s set up a carpet showroom in the eastern Pakistani city of Lahore, trading in carpets made in Afghan refugee villages in Pakistan. His brother stayed in Pakistan but Haji Nasim returned to Kabul.

"I was still hopeful that the situation would improve in Afghanistan and therefore did not decide to stay in Pakistan," he said. "Unfortunately, things deteriorated and we had no choice but to take refuge in Pakistan in 1988."

The family business flourished in Lahore, and in 1996, Haji Nasim decided to move beyond carpet trading to carpet manufacturing. "At that time, hand-made carpets with vegetable dyes were very popular in the United States and it seemed to be a profitable business," said the savvy businessman.

In 2000, he registered his company, Nasim Carpet Private Limited, in Lahore. At its peak, the company employed over 10,000 people, mostly of Turkmen, Hazara and Tajik ethnicities. Currently, some 5,000 workers are involved in different stages of carpet making, such as designing, wool dyeing, spinning and weaving. In addition to his factory in Lahore, he has commissioned work in different refugee villages throughout Pakistan.

The company exports some US$3 million worth of carpets every year with the "Made in Pakistan" label. Some 90 percent of the carpets go to the United States, where Haji Nasim deals with 10 different companies and has won an award in a carpet exhibition in Atlanta. The rest of the exports go to Europe.

He recently set up a sales centre in San Francisco "to know about the trends and to be able to deal more directly with the customers." But while he is eager to expand his business in the West, his heart remains in Pakistan.

"I am really grateful to the people and government of Pakistan because they gave the refugees all the facilities needed to establish and grow their business," said Haji Nasim, adding that it takes two hands to clap: "Hardworking refugees availed the opportunity and have proven themselves. Refugees involved in carpet weaving are always self-reliant and never depend on any kind of aid because they can earn a living themselves."

There are an estimated 20,000 Afghan carpet weavers in Pakistan, according to the registration of Afghans in Pakistan conducted from October 2006 to February 2007.
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Whose side are the Afghans on?
Telegraph.co.uk By Con Coughlin  12/04/2008
It took two years of fighting the Taliban to reclaim control of Musa Qala, but British troops in Afghanistan still face the daily prospect of betrayal by locals, reports Con Coughlin
It was meant to be a goodwill gesture to help improve relations between the Afghans and the British soldiers whose job it is to protect them. A couple of decorators were hired to spruce up the local school, which had fallen into a sorry state of repair during almost two years of incessant fighting between the Taliban and the British over the key strategic town of Musa Qala in Helmand - where, until recently, Prince Harry served as a forward air controller.

The decorators turned up for work as planned, and began repainting one of the classrooms. But such is the hostility of much of the population to the British soldiers encamped in the centre of their town that officers expressed concern for their safety when the time came for them to return to their home, nearly 50 miles away.

The British offered to fly the pair back by helicopter, by far the safest form of transport in an inhospitable region where the roads are regularly subjected to attack by Taliban militants. The workers declined, saying they were prepared to take their chances. But they never made it home: their convoy was ambushed by a group of Taliban fighters who, when they discovered the decorators had been working for the British, promptly hanged them.

When British forces took control of Musa Qala last December, it was hailed as a major breakthrough in their mission to stabilise the security situation throughout Helmand. Ever since the military deployed to the province in the south of Afghanistan nearly two years ago, control of the town - a Taliban stronghold and an important trading outpost for the heroin trade - has been the focus of some of the heaviest fighting in the country, and has accounted for many of Britain's 91 battlefield fatalities.

Having captured the town from the Taliban in the summer of 2006, the British handed control to tribal elders as part of a controversial deal brokered by the then commander of Nato's forces, British general David Richards. Within months, the town had been reoccupied by the Taliban, and the British had to launch yet another offensive to reclaim it.

When I visited the town this week with Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, the head of Britain's Armed Forces, Musa Qala was firmly back under British control. A heavily armed garrison drawn from 16 Air Assault Brigade, one of the Army's cutting-edge infantry units, was ensuring the Taliban were kept firmly at bay.

The recapture and occupation of the town represented a key strategic breakthrough for British commanders in their attempts to bring stability and security to Helmand. But persuading the population to abandon their support for the Taliban is altogether more daunting.

Sir Jock, a former fighter pilot, is optimistic about the mission's prospects. He insisted that, while the task of rebuilding Afghanistan presents a massive challenge for the 47,000-strong Nato force, the British have already made tangible progress in securing the territory.

"When you look at the scale of what needs to be done in Afghanistan, it sometimes looks like an impossible task," he explains. "But then, when you look back at the past two years, you see that a remarkable amount has already been achieved in a relatively small period of time.

"If you are going to eat an elephant, it is advisable not to eat it all at once, but just one small piece at a time."

In strictly military terms, the British deployment has indeed achieved many of the goals set when it first arrived in Helmand two years ago. All the key towns are firmly under British control. Yet the task of assisting the Afghans with reconstruction provides a different set of challenges, not least because of the enduring hostility of much of the population to their "liberation" by the British.

Fresh-faced young Scottish soldiers from the Argylls, who have the uncomfortable task of conducting foot patrols through the narrow streets and alleyways of downtown Musa Qala, liken the experience to "Crossmaglen on steroids".

"The locals will never look you in the eye," says a young officer coming off a patrol. "They walk past you with their eyes firmly fixed to the ground.

"They don't exactly make you feel welcome, and you get the distinct impression that they are just waiting to see which way the wind blows - are we going to tough it out and stay here, or are the Taliban going to return? They don't see any point in committing themselves until they see who is going to be in control."

Sir Jock believes the key to success in Helmand - and the rest of Afghanistan - is in making tangible progress in helping Afghans reconstruct of the country. "Reconstruction and security must work together, and security must be reinforced by the Afghan people," he told me. "But we must also have realistic aspirations. We cannot promise and then not deliver."

But the Taliban are well aware how important the reconstruction programme is for the ultimate success of the British mission, and have stepped up their campaign of intimidation against any Afghans who are willing to co-operate with Nato. Relatives of contractors prepared to work for the British have been abducted and, in the neighbouring city of Kandahar, a 12-year-old boy was beheaded after being found with a torch given to him by a Nato soldier.

Our senior commanders are also concerned that their efforts to improve security beyond the confines of their base are hampered by the lack of men and equipment, particularly helicopters - a complaint that has been repeated many times since the British military first deployed to Helmand.

To get to Musa Qala from the main British base at Camp Bastion, for example, Sir Jock and his party had to fly in an ancient Sea King helicopter that had been commandeered from the Royal Navy and hurriedly pressed into service in Helmand.

Most British units have now been provided with armoured vehicles that give proper protection against roadside bombs, one of the Taliban's favoured tactics for disrupting military operations. A Warrior armoured personnel carrier based at Musa Qala was immobilised earlier this month after being blown up by such a device, but none of the soldiers inside was seriously injured. Had they been travelling in a Snatch Land Rover, which was designed for riot control in Ulster, they would have been killed or seriously hurt.

But while the senior officers serving in Britain's inadequately funded military are used to having to contend with shortages of manpower and equipment, they have less experience of dealing with the challenges of reconstruction.

One of their most significant recent successes has been to persuade several tribal elders allied to the Taliban to switch sides. Mullah Salaam, the governor in Musa Qala, is a former Taliban leader who was induced to come over to the British at the end of last year. Police and security chiefs have similarly transferred allegiances, although Nato commanders remain cautious about whose side they are really on. "It is quite possible that everything we say and everything we do goes straight back to the Taliban," admitted a senior British officer.

In the case of the two murdered decorators, British officers are convinced that police officials know the identity of the culprits, but are reluctant to take any action because they are either related to them or, worse, sympathise with their motives. The British are well aware that many Afghan leaders they have to work with may still retain links with the enemy.

But then, coming to terms with the shifting mosaic of Afghan tribal allegiances and loyalties is part and parcel of doing business in this part of the world, and the British understand that it would be unwise to take any Afghan's protestations of loyalty for granted. As another officer remarked, "There's a saying round here: you can rent an Afghan, but you can't buy him."

When I attended a meeting Sir Jock held with tribal elders in Musa Qala, one of the main topics of conversation was what the British intended to do about rebuilding the mosque, which was severely damaged during bitter fighting between the British and the Taliban.

The British proposal is to build a new mosque that can hold about 800 people, but the elders' leader complained that one that held 2,000 would be preferable.

Sir Jock politely replied that he would look into the matter and see what he could do.

But as we left, I had the distinct impression that if the Taliban came forward with a plan to build a bigger mosque, the elders would have no hesitation in switching their allegiance back to their former allies, and abandoning their erstwhile protectors to an uncertain fate.  
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Rudd Says Musharraf Agreed to More `Dialogue' on Afghanistan
By Gemma Daley
April 11 (Bloomberg) -- Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf agreed to continued ``dialogue'' on the fight against the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan.

Rudd met Musharraf for 30 minutes in the southern Chinese resort city of Sanya. They talked about Pakistan helping the U.S.- led forces in Afghanistan, where Australia has 1,000 soldiers, Rudd said.

``A large part of the meeting focused on discussions relating to Afghanistan,'' Rudd's aide said in an e-mailed statement. ``The prime minister and president agreed that the dialogue on this and other Afghan matters would continue with our embassy in Afghanistan.''

The U.S. has the biggest military deployment in Afghanistan, with 15,000 soldiers under NATO command and 16,000 in a separate American command. Rudd said the leaders also discussed security relating to the canceled Australian cricket tour of Pakistan and Rudd hoped the tour could continue.

Australia postponed a cricket tour of Pakistan on March 3 because of safety concerns, hours after two bomb attacks in Lahore killed at least 22 people.

To contact the reporter on this story: Gemma Daley in Sanya at gdaley@bloomberg.net
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